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Dr. Mo Tian

Dr. Mo Tian

  • Organisation: Institut für Sprachen und Kulturen des Nahen Ostens und Ostasiens
  • Abteilung: Lehrstuhl für Sinologie
  • Telefonnummer: +49 9131 85 64372
  • E-Mail: mo.tian@fau.de

Mo Tian holds a PhD in history from the Australian National University (2016). His research  examines the social control of rural Manchuria under Japanese occupation during 1932 and 1945. His research interest lies in the area of social change of Northeast and North China during the Japanese occupation, and Republican and Communist eras. In addition, he is also interested in Chinese intellectual history, Japanese imperialism in Asia, and gender and sexuality in East Asia. Mo Tian was a teaching fellow at the Australian National University (2012-2016), a postdoctoral fellow at New York University Shanghai (2016-2017), and a research fellow at Jinan University (2017).

Selected Publications
“The condition of Asian studies in post-war Australia” for publication in eds. Asia Research Centre, Re-narrating Asian History and Culture, Fudan University Publishing House, forthcoming in 2017, in Chinese.

Chinese translation of Babara Watson Andaya, “Response to PrasentjiDuara, ‘Asia Redux’” for publication in eds. AsiaResearch Centre, Re-narrating Asian History and Culture, Fudan UniversityPublishing House, forthcoming in 2017.

Chinese translation of Rudolf Mrazek, “Floating. No Gears Shifting” for publication in eds. AsiaResearch Centre, Re-narrating Asian History and Culture, Fudan University Publishing
House, forthcoming in 2017.

Chinese translation of PrasenjitDuara, “Response to Comments on ‘Asia Redux’” for publication in eds. AsiaResearch Centre, Re-narrating Asian History and Culture, Fudan
University Publishing House, forthcoming in 2017.

“The Korean War and Manchuria: Economic and Human Effects,” in The Korean War in Asia: A Hidden History, eds. Tessa Morris-Suzuki and Adam Broinowski, Rowman &
Littlefield, forthcoming in 2017.

“The Baojia System as Institutional Control in Manchukuo under Japanese Rule (1932-45),” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, Issue 4, Vol. 59, 2016, 531-554.

“A Textual Reading of My Manchuria: Idealism, Conflict and Modernity,” in Japan as the Occupier and the Occupied, eds. Christine de Matos and Mark E. Caprio, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 249-267.

“Representing Gender, Power and Body in The Wedding Banquet,” Asia Pacific World, Vol.5, No.1, Spring 2014, 110-119.